The Observers

Ten years after Mubarak: 'militarisation has compromised any commemoration'

Our Observer, activist Ramy Raouf, was interviewed in our programme ten years ago. We contacted him again to get his perspective.
Our Observer, activist Ramy Raouf, was interviewed in our programme ten years ago. We contacted him again to get his perspective. © Observers France 24
By: Derek Thomson Follow | Djamel Belayachi
1 min

On February 11, 2011, Hosni Mubarak resigned under pressure from the street, making Egypt the second Arab country to overthrow its government. The revolution sparked hopes for a freer and egalitarian society. But the 2014 coup orchestrated by Abdel Fattah al-Sisi plunged the country back into a military dictatorship.

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Since then, the hopes raised during Egypt's Arab Spring have been dashed. Human rights continue to be violated, freedom of expression is non-existent and more than 60,000 people have been jailed for political reasons in the space of a few years. The outcome of the revolution is quite bleak.

We followed up with our Observer activist Ramy Raouf, ten years later. He told us why he didn’t even think of celebrating the anniversary of the revolution, and how the state prevents protests by tightly controlling telecommunications... as it used to under Mubarak.