DEBUNKED

Video scene falsely said to be delivery of arms to terrorists in Mali or Nigeria

Some people posted this video on social media saying it showed a helicopter supplying terrorists in Mali or Nigeria, but that's not the case.
Some people posted this video on social media saying it showed a helicopter supplying terrorists in Mali or Nigeria, but that's not the case. © Observers

Many Facebook groups based in Mali and Nigeria began sharing a video of a helicopter on December 9, claiming it showed an aircraft delivering weapons to terrorists. In Mali, the posts often accused the French government of operating the helicopter, while posts coming from Nigeria laid the blame on the Nigerian government. In reality, the video is from neither one of these countries – it was filmed in the Central African Republic during a routine supply drop.

Advertising

In the roughly three-minute video, a helicopter lands in a field before several people start to unpack its cargo. 

The video has been shared widely in Nigeria. Some posts claim that it shows "Fulani terrorists" being supplied by the government. Others say that the people receiving the supply are Boko Haram. 

Capture d'écran de l'intox circulant au Nigeria. Archivée ici : https://perma.cc/LTM3-SFR2
Capture d'écran de l'intox circulant au Nigeria. Archivée ici : https://perma.cc/LTM3-SFR2 © Facebook

Posts including the video, some of which have more than 300,000 views, were also shared in Mali, claiming to show "palpable proof" that the French army is involved in supplying terrorist groups there. This kind of rhetoric is commonly used by conspiracy theorists to stir up anti-French sentiment in the country.

A screenshot showing the video shared with a false caption. Archived here: https://perma.cc/T3E7-YXQF
A screenshot showing the video shared with a false caption. Archived here: https://perma.cc/T3E7-YXQF © Facebook

One of the videos was shared with a voiceover in Bambara, one of Mali's 13 national languages. The voiceover says the video reveals some of the things that are really going on "in the bush", stressing that the unidentified people in the video are speaking Fulani and that there is a white man present.

Looking for clues in the video and sound

Several sources, including members of the Tabital Pulaaku association, which promotes the Fulani language, confirmed to FRANCE 24 Observers that the people speaking in the video (who can be heard from 2:20 onward) do speak Fulani, but with an accent from eastern Niger. The discussion, however, does not offer any clues, consisting of an exchange of greetings and instructions on how to unload the helicopter.

On closer inspection of the video, however, it is possible to identify a crucial clue: a logo on the side of the helicopter, as well as a number, difficult to discern, on the back.

A screenshot of the video showing a logo on the side of the helicopter.
A screenshot of the video showing a logo on the side of the helicopter. © Observateurs

With the help of BenbereVerif, a fact-checking media outlet in Mali, we were able to identify the logo. It belongs to "African Parks", a nature conservation NGO based in South Africa that manages 19 parks across the African continent. We matched up the logo with other photos of African Parks helicopters that we found online. 

An African Parks helicopter.
An African Parks helicopter. © AFP / Tony Karumba

'The helicopter was transporting the Chinko outreach teams and their supplies to the park'

The African Parks operations manager, Erik Mararv, told the FRANCE 24 Observers team that the video was filmed in Chinko park, a nature refuge in the Central African Republic, which is managed by his organisation. He explained:

A video related to false information has been circulating on social media, distorting the location, people and activities in the footage.

African Parks can confirm that the videos shows one of its helicopters carrying out a routine resupply mission in Chinko, in the Central African Republic, on December 4. African Parks manages the site in partnership with the Central African government. 

During the mission, the helicopter was transporting the Chinko [Reserve] outreach teams and their supplies to the park, dropping off one team and their supplies in the field, and picking up another team. 

These teams conduct extended outreach missions in the field to engage with livestock owners who move through the area seasonally. They initiate a dialogue about the location of the Chinko [Reserve] to encourage them to use the established routes around the park's perimeter.

These outreach teams are unarmed, clearly identified and recruited from the local community in order to establish a relationship of trust with local herders, according to African Parks.