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BRAZIL

Volunteers rush to help animals hurt or displaced by wildfires in Brazil’s Pantanal wetlands

Volunteers helping animals who were injured or whose homes were destroyed by fire in the Pantanal, the world’s largest tropical wetlands, spanning a vast terrain in Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay (shared by our Observer Eduarda Fernandes).
Volunteers helping animals who were injured or whose homes were destroyed by fire in the Pantanal, the world’s largest tropical wetlands, spanning a vast terrain in Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay (shared by our Observer Eduarda Fernandes).
4 min

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More than 17,000 wildfires have been recorded since the start of the year in the Pantanal, a vast stretch of tropical wetlands in southwestern Brazil, which is considered a sanctuary to a remarkable array of biodiversity, including a large population of jaguars. Faced with this unprecedented crisis, volunteers are working around the clock to rescue the wild animals injured or displaced by the fires.

Devastating wildfires have ripped across the Brazilian Amazon and other tropical forests like the Pantanal, which covers parts of Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. This year alone, fires have destroyed over 13,000 square miles, or 23 percent, of the Brazilian portion of the Pantanal. This represents an ecological disaster, since the Pantanal is home to an wide range of wildlife, including 656 species of birds, 159 species of mammals and 98 species of reptiles.

Environmental experts were quick to understand the gravity of the situation and mobilised to help the animals trapped by the flames..

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