CHINA

Chinese high schools crack down on 'unauthorised' haircuts

In China, rules concerning the haircuts allowed in schools and high schools are very strict. Anything vaguely funky, such as bangs or (gasp!) a perm, is verboten. One Chinese school chose to get the message across with a humorous (and a tad cruel), illustrated billboard. Read more...

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In China, rules concerning the haircuts allowed in schools and high schools are very strict. Anything vaguely funky, such as bangs or (gasp!) a perm, is verboten. One Chinese school chose to get the message across with a humorous (and a tad cruel), illustrated billboard.

The photos of this billboard have become something of a sensation on the Chinese web since a high school student posted them on his blog. Its biting captions are merciless when they come to describing "inappropriate" student haircuts: 

 

1) Japanese gangster pirate hairstyle

2) Unmanly style (for men harbouring women’s bangs)

3) Nervous breakdown style

4) No-money-for-a-haircut, homeless style (for men with shaggy hair)

5) Wannabe Buddhist-nun style

6) Cute style if you’re a baby, retard style if you’re not

7) "No blade of grass growing on it" shiny style

8) Sinister "hold court from behind a screen" style

9) Migraine style (No face to see people)

10) Fraud and trickery style (fake eyelashes, lipstick, heavy makeup)

11) Old lady style (permed and dyed hair)

12) Old lady style 2 (unkempt hair)

 

13) Inappropriate modern/unfashionable style

 

14)"Cross-eyed" style

"Whoever drew these clearly had a sense of humour!"

Xiaodong Du lives and works in Shanghai. His high school also banned "original" cuts.

My school also used to have very strict rules on student’s hairstyles. But we had nothing as funny as these drawings – whoever drew these clearly has a creative sense of humour!

When I was in high school, boys and girls were not allowed to have long hair (for boys, it concerned hair covering the forehead, for girls, it concerned hair longer than shoulder-length). We weren’t allowed to dye our hair, we weren’t even allowed to use gel. Every week, a team of teachers would inspect each class to check if any student was breaking the rules. If there was, the entire class would lose a point in the overall school ranking. Therefore, most students paid attention to their hairstyles to make sure that they wouldn’t penalise the group. Of course, there were some students who insisted in choosing their own hairstyles and disregarding the rules – they were usually considered bad students.

Honestly, if my school had put up billboards as funny as this one rather than boring strict rules, I would have been more than happy to comply!"

The haircuts approved by Chinese high schools. All photos posted on the blog China Hush.