PAKISTAN

Pakistanis show their pride for national day, despite official cancellation

For Pakistanis outside the country's disaster zones and able to celebrate this year's national holiday on August 14, it will be a low key affair after the announcement just a day before from President Asif Ali Zardari that the official party has been cancelled.Read more...

Advertising

Flags on sale at the market. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.

For Pakistanis outside the country's disaster zones and able to celebrate this year's national holiday on August 14, it will be a low key affair after the announcement just a day before from President Asif Ali Zardari that the official party has been cancelled.

Fourteen million Pakistanis have been affected by the unprecedented flooding that has ravaged the country, according to a UN report, which includes 1,600 deaths.  The magnitude of the damage has already prompted the American government to pledge $55 million in emergency aid, while the UN announced a call for $460 million on Wednesday.

But in cities that have not been directly hit by the flooding, like Karachi, Pakistanis are showing their pride, as our Observer reports.

“We're used to floods, to attacks, to murders. We need a break”

Syed Yasir Kazmi is an amateur photographer who lives in Karachi. His account was given on Wednesday (12 August).

Everyone is rushing out to the markets to buy flags, hats, posters and stickers in green and white. Cars, motorcycles, and bicycles are all decorated too. The students have painted the walls with patriotic themes and faces of famous Pakistanis.

It is important for us to celebrate our national holiday in spite of the catastrophe that has struck our country. We are used to floods, to attacks, to murders. Every Pakistani is used to these ordeals. But we need a break; we don't want to be beaten. We want to move forward.

Independence Day is very important for us. This country was not built in one day. On August 14, we remember our ancestors who sacrificed themselves for our nation, and all the people who fought for future generations."

Small flags are also sold to decorate homes. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.

All forms of transportation dare decorated in national pride. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.

Pakistanis walk in the streets with flags. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.

Pakistanis sport national pride with face paint. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.

"I love Pakistan" printed on various objects in the markets. Photo published by Syed Ysir Kazmi, August 10, 2010.