IRAN

Tehran: “I’m too scared to leave the house”

The day after Ayatollah Ali Khameni's speech in Tehran, thousands of demonstrators poured onto the streets, despite being told not to. The response from the authorities was severe. One of our Observers there gives his account of what was possibly the most violent day since the start of the protests. Read more...

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The day after Ayatollah Ali Khameni's speech in Tehran, thousands of demonstrators poured onto the streets of the Iranian capital, despite being told not to. The response from the authorities was severe. One of our Observers there gives his account of what was possibly the most violent day since the start of the protests.

Tehran on Saturday night

Protests continue into the night.

Photos sent to FRANCE 24 by Web users

Mullahs join in the protests, Tehran.

“The Basij are taking to homes too”

Mohsen (not his real name), 28, works in IT in Tehran. He participated in the protests on Saturday.

We were caught like rats, not knowing who would attack first: the police or the Basij militia. They were waiting at every crossroads, every block, and especially the roads that lead to Inqilab Square (Revolution Square). As soon as we came into view, they came charging.   

They hit me with batons until they drew blood, they were firing tear gas directly at us. I saw a 40-year-old man die in front of me. At one point I tried to flee the Basij by hiding in a building with a group of youths. But because they were firing tear gas into the hallways, we had to get out to breathe. As soon a few people stepped outside, they attacked them. I tried to run up to the third floor with a few others, but we collapsed out of breath. Somebody opened his front door for us and we crawled inside. He saved us. The Basij know people are helping us out though, which is why they're taking to homes too.

I didn't leave that man's house until things had calmed down. Then I went back to my uncle's. I haven't gone out since, I'm too scared to leave the house. Most of my friends feel the same way. They've seen people die with their own eyes, they're scared of being arrested... we're just terrified."