USA

America’s workers at breaking point

The scene shown in this video took place outside a car dealership where 30 people were laid off. The footage has already become popular on the Web - it's both sad, and yet rather amusing, depending on how you look at it. But it also reveals a widespread and mounting discontent that's pushing America's workforce to bursting point. Read more and see the video...

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The scene shown in this video took place outside a car dealership where 30 people were laid off. The footage has already become popular on the Web - it's both sad, and yet rather amusing, depending on how you look at it. But it also reveals a widespread and mounting discontent that's pushing America's workforce to bursting point.

You hear the mammoth figures. Tens of billions of dollars in losses last year; hundreds of thousands of employees put out of work. There's no denying it; the American automobile industry's is in dire straits. But where you'll really feel it, is in the country's old industrial heartland, where entire communities have been left in disarray by the tumbling industry. One of those places is Michigan, where the following scene was shot.

© News Channel 3

 

The scene, filmed by local TV station News Channel 3, unfolded outside a Chevrolet car dealership in the small Michigan town of Wayland. The dealership had just announced to its employees that it would be closing, leaving the 30 members of staff jobless.

Among them was Jason Stanton (the man in red with a pink cap). After intoxicating himself, the worker took up the matter with one of his colleagues, who had also lost his job. It was one of three fights that followed the news. All of which, according to the local authorities, were fuelled by alcohol.

On a separate note, the information given by News Channel 3 was not entirely accurate. The man interviewed in the blue shirt appeared to be the same one attacked in the first shot. But when we called him to verify what happened, we were surprised to find out that he had nothing to do with the violence, and had simply been interviewed about the closure of the dealership as a concerned Wayland resident. Chemist Mike Shea, who's name was even mentioned in the online report, explained that he was stopped by the channel for his opinion before the violence broke out, and was surprised to see himself featured in the report as though he were one of those involved.