USA

Video reveals police brutality of man in diabetic coma

The man in this video was arrested by the police after driving on the wrong side of the motorway for 16 miles. He was then dragged out of his car through the window and detained by two officers. All the while, suffering a diabetic crisis, Rod Mayo was unconscious. Read more and watch the video...

Advertising

The man in this video was arrested by the police after driving on the wrong side of the motorway for 16 miles. He was then dragged out of his car through the window and detained by two officers. All the while, suffering a diabetic crisis, Rod Mayo was unconscious.

The 58-year-old former car trader posted the video on Liveleak and YouTube last week in the hope of attracting public support for his upcoming trial against the officers. Although the incident happened in August 2002, the video was not retrieved until 2005 and it has since taken four years for Mayo to bring a case against the state. While Mayo says the police broke his arm; the press office at Vermont State Police say he suffered no broken bones. However, Mayo has now filed suit with two of the officers involved for bad conduct. He is currently awaiting a date for the trial. This video, and the photos below, will serve as evidence in the case.

 

Rod posted the video on Liveleak and YouTube on January 20.

"It looked to me like the police were amped up on adrenaline and weren't thinking clearly"

"Johnny Law" is a police officer from the US. He writes a blog but prefers to remain anonymous.

I hate to be critical of other officers but if I saw a rookie handle a stop like that, I would chew his ass. I am pretty darn sure they weren't trained like that. In situations like this, it is standard police practice to conduct what is called a "felony stop" once the vehicle is stopped. A felony stop consists of the officers stopping behind the suspect vehicle and staying in a position of cover. Several officers keep their weapons trained on the suspect vehicle while another officer uses the loudspeaker to give commands to the bad guy. The bad guy is typically directed to exit the vehicle with his hands up and to walk backwards to the cops. An officer will then come up behind the bad guy and cuff him. Once this is done, officers carefully move up to the suspect vehicle and check to make sure there isn't anyone inside. The purpose of a felony stop is to have everyone slow down and take the bad guy into custody in a controlled and safe manner. The arrest shown in this video is the exact opposite of a controlled and safe manner. Plus, I didn't see any officers covering the bad guy. If the bad guy had been armed, he could have easily killed those officers. It was very poor tactics. 

Now in their defence, it looks like they had a pretty exciting chase and I am sure they only wanted to secure the driver as quickly as possible. Unfortunately it looked to me like the police were amped up on adrenaline and weren't thinking clearly through the excitement.

Since the driver claims to have been in diabetic shock, it is possible that he wouldn't have come out of the car even if the cops had done it right.  If that had happened, the police would have had to go get him eventually but at least they would have had time to make a plan on how to approach."

"Three years later… the police were still denying they had any video recording of the incident"

Rod is a 58-year-old former car trader from Colchester, Vermont. He is no longer able to work due to a disability. Rod says he had been diabetic for 30 years before the incident, which was the first time it had happened, and that he was since been prescribed a different type of insulin.

I'd just left my doctor's office 40 minutes before, been given a check-up, went to the pharmacist to pick up some medication, and was on my way home for lunch. The next thing I remember is my family reviving me in hospital. It was totally frightful. I'd driven 16 miles on the I-89 interstate [highway], the wrong way. The police stopped my car by laying spikes on the road. They thought I was on drugs. After what you see in the video, they took me to hospital and handcuffed me to a gurney [hospital trolley] where I was left without medical attention for three hours. My blood sugar level was 20 [fatally dangerous]. I was wearing a chain around my neck and I also had a card in my wallet that said I'm diabetic insulin dependent, but they never checked.

Three years later, when the police were still denying they had any video recording of the incident, my attorney managed to retrieve the recordings from the car of the off-duty policeman, the one you see in shorts. He was from another district, so his cruiser hadn't been checked out. With that evidence we're suing the state and the police officers, and two of them, the two most heavily involved, are definitely forward for bad conduct. Their actions were brutal and excessive and they were untrained."

Photos taken in hospital after the incident, which Rod plans to use in his trial against the officers.