'Orthodox missionaries' track down Pussy Riot supporters

 
They call themselves “Orthodox missionaries,” and they’re looking to pick a fight with anyone who supports Pussy Riot, the anti-Putin punk rockers whose trial recently made international headlines. These Christian extremists even film their attacks.
 
At the end of August, two of these “Orthodox missionaries” filmed themselves ripping off a man’s T-shirt, which was adorned with a picture of the members of Pussy Riot depicted as saints. Following the attack, which took place on a train platform in Moscow, one of the assailants crossed himself in front of the camera and brandished the ripped-up T-shirt, saying, “This is what will happen to all those who commit blasphemy.”
 
"Orthodox missionaries" attack a passerby.
 
The two assailants then explained their act at length:
 
“A man was walking in the street, wearing this T-shirt… So we caught up with him near the train that goes to the airport… I asked him, ‘Are you going to stay in Saint Russia? … Your T-shirt is offends my religious beliefs.’ In fact, it’s offensive to all Orthodox Christians. I told him I was going to call the police, pursuant to article 282 of Russia’s criminal code which prohibits ‘incitement to religious hatred.’”
 
The man speaking to the camera goes on: “I am sick of seeing these people; if they’re not punished, it’s going to get worse… We’ve stopped a crime from being committed today.”
 
It is difficult to gauge how many people actually belong to this group of extremist Orthodox Christians. However, the online debate surrounding their videos reveals the deep tensions caused by the Pussy Riot trial in Russia. The band’s three young singers were convicted on August 17 to two years in prison for “hooliganism” and “incitement to religious hatred” for having sung what they called a “punk prayer” in a church. Their sentencing divided Russian public opinion, some saying the punishment was completely out of proportion, while others, particularly Christian Orthodox and nationalist groups, continue to express outrage over Pussy Riot’s stunt.
 
The punk band’s detractors gathered in front of the tribunal on the day of the verdict; the next day, “Orthodox missionaries” attacked Pussy Riot sympathisers in a café. Then, on August 27, members of this same group interrupted a tribute to the punk band at a theatre in Moscow, yelling at the public and at journalists present: “Why do you hate Russia?”
 
Video showing pro-Pussy Riot T-shirts being made.
 
Following the trial, T-shirts in support of Pussy Riot made their appearance in the streets of Moscow and other Russian cities. One such shirt is illustrated with one of the group's singers depicted as the Virgin Mary. The shirt's designer was fined 1000 roubles (about 25 euros) for “offending religion.” In March, he had already made posters with the same image, which he had put up in the streets of Novosibirsk. After Sunday’s attack at Moscow’s train station, the artist declared that he would offer new T-shirts to all victims of “Orthodox missionaries.”
Contributors

Comments

Another misleading article about the subject

How about telling the public that the issue with Pussy Riot was not their anti-Putin song but that they chose to do that in a church? That is the issue that many members of the Ortodox Church did not like. Western propaganda, such as this article, on another hand loves to twist this case to become an anti-Putin demonstration.

SIGH

Um, the anti Putin message of the the song is not mentioned in the article while the fact that the performance happened in a Church was. It get's tiresome wading through comments by folks who obviously have not read the post in question.

Close