Tunisia

Preachers take over public spaces in Tunisia

 
In front of schools, on buses or in public squares, and for several months now, a new phenomenon has been spreading across Tunisia: religious preachers. Whether they are originally from Tunisia or come from the Gulf States, more and more of them are using public spaces to promote their vision of religion. Read more...
 
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Are Sub-Saharan Africans being targeted in post-Ben Ali Tunisia?

 
A student from Sub-Saharan Africa living in the Tunisian capital called the police after a group of men started throwing stones at his apartment. However, after reaching out to the police for help, the victim was arrested. Our Observer, who filmed the incident, believes the arrest was entirely racially motivated and that such discrimination is on the rise in post-Ben Ali Tunisia. Read more...
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Parsley, or spicing up Tunisia's freedom of the press

 
Although the symbol of the Tunisian revolution was jasmine, a far more prosaic plant — parsley — took over the streets of Tunis on Thursday when an opposition TV station organized a massive sale of parsley bundles to raise funds and fight back against partisans of Ennahda, the ruling Islamic party. Read more...
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Neighbour of murdered Tunisian opposition leader: “I heard four shots”

 
The head of a Tunisian opposition party was shot dead this morning in Tunis. Bel Fekih Amine, a neighbour of his, lives right above the scene of the crime. He told us what he witnessed. Read more...
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Arson attack sends Tunisia’s Sidi Bou Said mausoleum up in smoke

 
On Saturday, two days before the second anniversary of the fall of former Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the mausoleum in Sidi Bou Said, in a chic northern suburb of Tunis, was deliberately set on fire. The anthropologist Youssef Seddik describes his anger at the destruction of the mausoleum’s precious manuscripts. Read more...
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Islamists throw TVs on beach to denounce “corrupt” media

 
Concerned by what they say is incompetent and corrupted media, the League for the Protection of the Revolution (LPR), a group of activists that is, according to Tunisia’s opposition, close to the Islamist party in power, organised a “flash mob” protest in the city of Sousse. Television sets were thrown onto the beach like rubbish. Read more...
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Meet Slimane Rouissi, a catalyst of the Tunisian revolution

 
Two years ago, a young, impoverished vegetable seller named Mohammed Bouazizi set himself on fire in the central Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid. His desperate act sparked a revolution that ousted the country’s leader and marked the start of a series of revolutions throughout the region, now known as the Arab Spring. However, his story would never have been told throughout the world – if it were not for a small group of activists, including a man named Slimane Rouissi. Read more…
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Footage of French police deporting Tunisian man sparks outrage

 
A video of an undocumented migrant being forced by the police to board a plane for Tunis last weekend has caused outrage on the Internet. The man who took the video says he is shocked by the inhumane treatment suffered by his compatriot. Read more...
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Pollution turns a Tunisian lake blood red

 
Cap Bon, a cape located in northern Tunisia, is known for its resorts and its rich biodiversity. However, one of its villages, Mrigueb, is now experiencing an ecological catastrophe: the waters of the wadi located next to it have turned bright red, due to pollution from fish processing factories. Read more…
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