traffic

Uganda’s motorbike taxis: a speedy way … to get yourself killed

Some 32 percent of the deaths on Ugandan roads take place on a motorbike or scooter. And yet for locals and tourists alike, the country's No. 1 form of transport is the "boda boda", or motorbike-taxi. Read more...

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Reporting drivers on Facebook

New Delhi only has about 5000 traffic police officers for the 12 million inhabitants. To control the traffic, the police have to count on… Facebook users! Read more...

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If the bigwigs use flashing lights, the Moscovites will use blue buckets

The Moscow movement against self-declared VIPs - or bureaucrats who use flashing lights illegally to evade traffic queues - is growing in strength. On Sunday, two hundred Moscovites took to the streets with blue buckets secured, upside-down, on top of their car roofs. Did the police stop them? But of course! See the videos...

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Road rage against self-declared VIP in Moscow

About a thousand officials in Russia have the right to use flashing lights on their cars. But many more use it without being allowed, and blatantly ignore traffic rules, driving on the wrong side of the road, passing through red lights and generally being a danger to other road users. To highlight this problem, a Russian businessman filmed himself blocking the Mercedes of an official driving the wrong way down a street in Moscow. Read more…

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Caught jumping the lights? Nothing a bit of cash can't sort out...

Traffic violations often go unnoticed in Russia but, if you do get stopped, it's much less hassle to hand over a bit of cash than to file a report and take it to court. In fact, going about it the official way proves almost impossible, as one of our Observers in the country found out. Read more and see the vidoes...

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Watch this video and you'll never moan about the traffic again

These images were filmed by a CCTV camera at a crossroads in Shanghai. The traffic is chaotic to the extreme. It might be funny for us, but for the authorities, who will be welcoming 70 million visitors during Expo 2010, the problem is serious. See the video and read more...

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Moscovites fed up with "fat cat" convoys blocking roads

Putin's convoy in Budapest. Image: Lorinc Sonnevend on Flickr.

Frustrated by increasing numbers of official corteges blocking traffic - even emergency services - for up to twenty minutes, one Muscovite webuser decided to film the practice on his mobile phone and post it online. Read more and see the video...

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How to protest road tolls in China: pay in coppers

In protest of increasing and frequently placed road tolls in China, a couple of drivers thought they'd put a fork in the system by paying their charge in copper coins. It took so many guards so long to count them, that the gate was blocked for forty minutes. And yet, everyone seemed to find it hilarious. See the photos...

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Dancing policeman

For the past 23 years, police officer Tony Lepore has been coming out of retirement to direct traffic on Rhode Island, Massachusetts. The 60-year-old ex-warden spends each Christmas directing drivers with a festive version of the traffic warden's code. This year his moves have caught the attention of internet users. Videos of the dancing policeman can be found on blogs all over the world.

 Video posted 13 December 2007.

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