riots

Yahoo and MSN helping to root out Tibetan rioters

The 'most wanted' on Yahoo's homepage this morning

Yahoo! China pasted a "most wanted" poster across its homepage today in aid of the police's witch-hunt for 24 Tibetans accused of taking part in the recent riots. MSN China made the same move, although it didn't go as far as publishing the list on its homepage. Read more...

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First pictures of Tibet killings

Chinese authorities have so far reported 13 dead since the beginning of the incidents while Tibetan activists say that at least one hundred people have been killed. These amateur photos, which we’re the first to publish, contradict the official Chinese statement. Read more…

© Free Tibet Campaign

Contributors

"The kids are not to blame"

A protest in Belgrade of 150,000 people against the independence of Kosovo turned into a mass riot yesterday. Our Observer from Serbia says that the government is only adding fuel to the fire. Read more…

Protesters in central Belgrade yesterday afternoon.

 

In Kenya, hate media has found a new home

The message Mashada posted on their forum page

One of Kenya's most popular discussion forums had to close its doors yesterday because of a barrage of abusive and hate-inciting comments left by web-users. James X runs the ‘Mashada' project. He explains that the site's once relatively peaceful discourse had taken a decisively violent turn since the elections. It seems that the internet is being used to fuel ethnic loathing. Could this media become the next Radio Mille Collines? Read more...

Contributors

Misuse of power

These images were shown on Kenyan television on Tuesday. The scene was filmed in Kisumu (east), a stronghold of the opposition and where three protesters have been killed in two days (more on the riots). The film is now being circulated by Kenyan bloggers, who are condemning the national security forces for misuse of power.

Video posted on Youtube on 17 January 2007 - source : KTN

 

Contributors

Kenyan web users gang together on ‘Google Maps’

Text messages played an important part in the Kenya protests at the end of last month. Now, Kenyan bloggers have found a new way to circulate information about the riots, rapes and murders that tear through their country. Our Observer Daudi Were, one of the project organisers, explains to us how it works. Read more...

Contributors

“For the Camorra, trash is gold”

Photo by Sebastiano Sacco, via Dario Salvelli's blog, Jan. 9 2008.

We published a post on the 'trash crisis' in Naples, Italy, Saturday. The problem is far from over and the Neapolitans continue to confront the police force. Images of these riots have been circulating across the world, but there’s a lack of information on the context and the twists in this particularly complicated, internecine crisis. Why is Naples unable to manage its garbage disposal like other European cities? Our observer, Alessia Storia, worked for a public sector waste management company. She details the responsibilities of the local authorities and the might of the Camorra, the dreaded Sicilian mafia, in this crisis. Read more...

Our Observer takes a look around post-protest Nairobi

Raila Odinga supporters gave up their protests yesterday, when the Orange Democratic Movement members finally gave in to the fact that planned rally would not be going ahead due to police control. Our Observer Daudi Were followed the police as they blockaded entrances to the city and told people to go home. And William Woeri, who's on the scene today, updates us on the current situation. Read more...

 

35 burned alive in a church, a pastor bears witness

An angry crowd set fire to a church near Eldoret (west Kenya) on Tuesday killing at least 35 people including women and children. Our Observer for Kenya, Fredrick Onyango, put us in contact with a pastor from Langas, a small town in the suburbs of Eldoret. With all shops closed, he explains to us how he cannot feed the sixty refugees he's currently housing in the church. Read his testimony.

Rumours sent by text add to violence

While signs of electoral fraud accumulate, the country responds to the results and the death count creeps up (250 on Tuesday morning). Our Observer Fredrick Onyango, who was pleased with election procedures on Friday, reassesses the situation today. He is particularly concerned about the amount of rumours circulating, apparently by text message. Read more...

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