election

Graffitied over and covered up, Libyan women parliamentary hopefuls’ posters vandalised

 
With Libya’s historic parliamentary elections just days away, the streets of the capital Tripoli have been plastered with campaign posters. Yet walking around, a trend becomes apparent – many of those featuring female candidates have been destroyed while those of men are left largely untouched. Our Observer in Tripoli says that the vandalism may be a sign that many in Libya are simply not ready to see a woman in office. See the images…
 
 
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Benghazi election offices attacked as Libya vote approaches

 
Hundreds of protestors stormed Libya’s High National Election Committee in the eastern city of Benghazi on Sunday in protest against the country’s upcoming parliamentary elections. The attack, which comes in the run up to Libya’s first democratic polls since former leader Muammar Gaddafi’s downfall, highlights some of the challenges facing the fragile country as it endeavours to transition toward democracy. Read more…
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Protest for fair elections spirals out of control in Kuala Lumpur

 
What began as a peaceful demonstration to demand electoral reforms soon degenerated into violence after Malaysian police and protesters scuffled in the capital Kuala Lumpur over the weekend, prompting widespread allegations of police brutality and excessive force. Yet footage of the event has sparked questions as to what role demonstrators played in the unrest. Watch the videos…
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Six French citizens share their hopes and opinions on the 2012 presidential elections

 
As France’s presidential elections quickly approach, we asked our Observers in France to share what issues they would like to see take centre stage during the campaign. Read more…

“If you give your son a country... you can only be Mubarak!”

 With the Egyptian presidential elections just a year away, criticism against the candidacy of Gamal Mubarak, son of longstanding president Hosni Mubarak, is mounting. In a country where political expression is tightly controlled, Gamal’s opponents turn to wry humour to express themselves. Read more...

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British tabloid turns topless models Tory blue to sway voters

Daily tabloid the Sun has been accused of Photoshopping the colour of underwear worn by glamour models in the newspaper to blue - the colour of the Tory party. The photo was published on Wednesday's "Page Three" - which has been reserved for a daily topless model since the 1970s and is considered something of a British institution. Read more...

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UK election posters...after a lick of paint

This year UK election campaigns are, for the first time, being played out largely on the Web. However, although it might be easier - and legal - to edit a campaign poster on Photoshop, the old-fashioned method of taking a can of spray paint to a real billboard has not entirely disappeared. Here are our favourites from around the UK...

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Can UK liberal hold on to his soaring popularity for election?

After the first battle in a three part televised debate between Britain's major party leaders led to a massive boost for the "third man", Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg has been catapulted into the spotlight, lavished over and picked apart by both the electorate and the press. Welcome to the UK, where "Cleggmania" is contagious... but for how long? Read more...

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UK election: let the best joker win

Thursday night saw the UK's first ever live pre-election televised debate between the three major party leaders. But it's not the only sign that British election campaigning is warming to American rules. As in the 2008 presidential election in the US, spoofing is playing a major part in the race - not only with voters, but politicians too. Read more and see the posters...

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Conservatives to lose the election…. to Photoshop?

While Conservative and Labour politicians are busy campaigning for the forthcoming general election, supporters of both parties have armed themselves with Photoshop and engaged in a battle on the Internet. Such is the level of online activity, it's been hailed as "the first e-election" in Britain. Will David Cameron and Gordon Brown have their fates sealed by Web users? Read more...

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