Egypt

Trees vanishing from post-revolution Cairo

 
The once-lush Cairo suburb of Heliopolis is noticeably less green than it was two years ago, before the Egyptian revolution. Our Observer tells us that both local authorities and residents have been cutting down trees haphazardly, and that due to a leadership void that has persisted since the revolution, there is nobody to turn to for help. Read more...
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Morsi’s new powers: "necessary" or "dictatorial"?

 
Egypt’s Islamist president Mohammed Morsi has granted himself a slew of new powers, prompting protests throughout Egypt on Friday. Those protesting fear that their first elected president since the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak is turning out to be just another dictator. Read more...

Anti-sexual harassment squads patrol the streets of Cairo

 
Sexual harassment has plagued Egypt for years, and it’s getting worse. Today, more than 80% of Egyptian women saying they’ve been victimized. Faced with the government’s inertia, a group of men has decided to take to the streets to stop perpetrators. Read more...

Egyptian hospitals on strike: “The Muslim Brotherhood wants to maintain a stranglehold on healthcare”

 
On Monday morning, more than 500 public hospitals in Egypt began an unlimited national strike. The staff is calling for, among other things, a tripling of the budget allocated to the public health sector. But in Egypt, where the Muslim Brotherhood has developed its own parallel healthcare system, the Islamist government does not seem to be willing to prioritise the public health sector’s development. Read more...
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French expats react to embassy closures

 
France has ordered the closure of its embassies, schools, and embassies Friday in 20 countries, mostly in the Muslim world. The French government is worried that these institutions could be targeted during protests against French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo’s publication of incendiary cartoons representing the Prophet Mohammed. We asked three French expatriates living in Muslim countries what they thought of these measures. Read more…

Security forces destroy second-hand book stalls in Alexandria

 
Alexandria’s Prophet Daniel Street (“Ennaby Daniel” in Arabic) is one of Egypt’s most well-known streets, thanks to its famous second-hand book stalls. However, the cultural life of the street came under threat last week when the authorities came and dismantled a number of the booksellers’ stands in the middle of the night. Read more...
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Meet the parkour athletes of the Great Pyramids

 
You may have heard of parkour, the physical discipline that involves moving around urban obstacles as swiftly as possible, and which includes everything from scaling walls to backflips to leaping between rooftops. In Egypt, parkour fans have found a stunning new backdrop for this athletic art: the Great Pyramids. Read more...
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The protesters of Tahrir Square: democratic watchdogs or 'naive minority'?

 
Cairo’s Tahrir Square has been besieged by protesters every day since former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak was handed his sentence Saturday. Demonstrators claim the country’s justice system is controlled by the army, and want to cancel the second round of the presidential elections, in which Mubarak’s former prime minister Ahmed Shafiq is one of the two candidates. However, they do not have the support of all Egyptians. Read more…
 

Despair in Tahrir Square: "We don’t trust the military or the Muslim Brotherhood"

 
Thousands of Egyptians took to the streets Monday night following the announcement of the official results of the presidential election's first round. In the capital, but also in several other cities across the country, demonstrators vented their anger at having to choose between a member of the former regime and a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. Our Observer in Cairo tells us more…

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